In The Red Records 25th Anniversary w/ The Gories, Ty Segall & Mikal Cronin

The Echo & In The Red Records Present

In The Red Records 25th Anniversary w/ The Gories, Ty Segall & Mikal Cronin

Thu July 14, 2016

7:30 pm

Echo + Echoplex

Los Angeles, CA

This event is all ages

In The Red Records 25th Anniversary
In The Red Records 25th Anniversary
Seminal indie label In The Red Records is pleased to announce a very special, three-night event in Los Angeles to celebrate it's 25th Anniversary.

Taking place July 14th through 16th at the Echo and Echoplex in Los Angeles, In The Red Records 25th Anniversary will feature performances from bands spanning the existence of the label - with performances from legendary acts and genre pioneers including The Gories, The Oblivians, Boss Hog (with Jon Spencer and Cristina Martinez) and Cheater Slicks, a rare performance of Ty Segall and Mikal Cronin's 2009 collaboration Reverse Shark Attack, GØGGS' first live show, sets from bands on the forefront of the current garage rock and psych landscapes including Meatbodies, Wand, CCR Headcleaner and many, many more.

In The Red Records 25th Anniversary 3-day passes will be available for $[PRICE] and 3-day VIP passes, which include {INSERT] will be available for $[PRICE]. Tickets go on sale [DATE] at [TICKET LINK]. For more information, please visit [WEBSITE].

Founded in Los Angeles in 1991 by Larry Hardy, In The Red has become an institution and purveyor of hard-hitting garage, psych and rock n' roll. Over the course of it's 25 years, In The Red has boasted a monumental roster, with celebrated releases from The Gories, Cheater Slicks, Oblivians, The Deadly Snakes, Reigning Sound, Boss Hog, The King Khan & BBQ Show, Kid Congo, Jay Reatard, Vivian Girls, Thee Oh Sees, Ty Segall Band, The Spits, The Fresh & Onlys, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Black Lips, Fuzz and many, many more.
Wounded Lion
Wounded Lion
It's a rare album for which a Urinals namedrop serves as a meaningful reference, but IVXLCDM is such a record. These Angelinos sound old beyond their years, perhaps in part because they approach music from a visual arts background, like many of their influences from the earliest reaches of post-punk. The quintet's repertoire consists mostly of one- and two-chord vamps, but Wounded Lion attacks them with a Burma/Ubu/Pink Flag force, and anyone familiar with those icons has already decided whether to check this out.
Four of Wounded Lion's members are credited with bass duties, which explains the low-end throb that propels these ten tracks. On their debut the band took some dings for sounding overly goony- so credit newcomer Lars Finberg for extinguishing any such shortcomings. Finberg's take-no-prisoners drumming credentials have been firmly established in the incendiary A-Frames, and he brings a similar severity to bear here.
Wounded Lion's lyrics still aren't a strong suit, but that's hardly the point. After numerous two-minute punk blasts, the height of IVXLCDM's intensity arrives on "Raincheck Vibrations," a seven minute monster that if you listen closely consists of plot synopses of Love Boat and Batman episodes, as recounted by a borderline manic Brad Eberhard. (Obscure reference point alert: anyone remember Tripod Jimmie?) The band then wraps up the proceedings with an unrecognizable cover of Lou Reed's "Oh, Jim," introducing a Farfisa and some of the Velvets' trademark strum to the Berlin nugget.
IVXLCDM captures a raw immediacy – for some reason I can vividly picture tracks like "Roman Values" blowing the doors off the back of the EARL's music room. These Lions may be wounded, but they're defiantly untamed.
Zig Zags
Zig Zags
In the year 2014 in the ruins of the city once known as Los Angeles, three underworld dwellers with one job, one hot tub and one unkillable riff between them knew they had to make a ripping record—or die trying. This is their story.
Guitarist Jed, bassist Patrick, and drummer Bobby started in a room lit by a single green light, which changed them from humans to Zig Zags in the summer of 2009. Within the next five years, they’d record a song with Iggy Pop and an album with Ty Segall and go from playing house parties for pizza to staring off the stage at the Fillmore West. But back then that was still in the future. Before them had come giants—bands like Kiss and Sabbath whose names were carved into desks in detention for decades. Before them had come mutants, heavy metal and punk bands like the Dictators and Pentagram that spun into the void of history after failed orbital rendezvous with the fame they’d deserved. And before them had come freaks, one-known-copy private press insanities like J.T. IV, White Boy and the Average Rat Band, the bands that happened when someone with a guitar thought FUCK IT loud enough for the tape to pick up. Those were visionaries, each of them, even if most of them paid—or never got paid—for it. And Zig Zags had a vision, too. It was a dark and weird one, the kind of thing you see flickering on the monitor when your stolen spaceship wakes you up from cryosleep, or the kind of thing that flashes across the inside of your forehead when you wake up hungover from sleeping in your van. Theirs was the nightmare of the insane and the all-too-normal, the Bermuda Triangle between sci-fi and lo-fi and no-budget, the Twilight Zone twist ending where it turns out everyone ELSE was an alien the whole time. When Cliff Burton wore that Misfits shirt—Zig Zags. When the Emergency Broadcast System interrupts that John Carpenter movie—Zig Zags. When a soggy pile of Thrasher mags and Jack Kirby comics spill out of a dumpster behind the Sunday School—Zig Zags. When the Ramones were scared of the basement and the Angry Samoans couldn’t find the right side of their mind—Zig Zags. When a kid breaks his elbow copying a WWF heel’s piledriver and starts laughing instead of crying—Zig Zags. And when the electricity goes off forever and torchlight reflects off chrome—Zig Zags. All of this and more becomes real on the Zig Zags’ self-titled debut LP, recorded and produced by Ty Segall for In The Red. In 12 songs, they chainsaw through weirdo film and caveman rock and space noise and make smart sound so dumb it turns inside-out and becomes brilliant. Their very first 7” had a song scalled “Scavenger” cuz that’s what Zig Zags do—dig through garbage to find genius. In 2014, it turns out they did make their ripping record. But it’s up to you to figure out the twist ending.
100 Flowers
100 FLOWERS (previously known as THE URINALS) were a power trio whose sole 1983 album is an enduring document of the Southern California underground. Based in crime-ridden '80s Los Angeles against the backdrop of juvenile hardcore and vapid hard rock, 100 FLOWERS crafted a sound that rests between the inspired bursts of THE MINUTEMEN and the pastoral jangle of THE DREAM SYNDICATE with similarities to the equally oblique MONITOR and THE GUN CLUB (who even included a URINALS cover in their set). The trio wielded a gripping visual aesthetic and hyper-literate lyrical content that reflected their art-school backgrounds, while a ferocity and frustration borne out of their bleak urban environment permeates their songs. Strains of UK post-punk can be heard on "All Sexed Up" and skittish tension on "Presence of Mind." A far cry from the beach punk and surf rock of their contemporaries, album closer "California's Falling into the Ocean" contains all of their signature qualities: off-kilter delivery, subversive sentiments, and an irrefutable pop sensibility that reflects their immersion in LA's burgeoning Paisley Underground scene. The band splintered shortly after the release of this album, but time has only intensified the urgency of 100 FLOWERS' music. But hopefully with the recent reissue of the band's complete output on Superior Viaduct, a new generation of fans is about to emerge...

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