BEAK> + A Place To Bury Strangers

Desert Daze Presents

BEAK> + A Place To Bury Strangers

Chasms

Thu October 11, 2018

8:00 pm

Echoplex

Los Angeles, CA

$16 Advance / $20 Day of Show

This event is 18 and over

Desert Daze Kick Off Week

BEAK>
BEAK>
MATT WILLIAMS [ Fairhorns/Knife,library]
GEOFF BARROW [PORTISHEAD/DROKK]
BILLY FULLER [ANIKA/FUZZ AGAINST JUNK]

BEAK> were formed in January 2009 by three Bristol musicians, Billy Fuller, Matt Williams and Geoff Barrow. The band have very strict guidelines governing the recording and writing process of their work. The music was recorded live in one room with no overdubs or repair, only using edits to create arrangements. All tracks were written over a twelve-day session in SOA Studio's, Bristol. The album is to be released on Invada records UK and Europe. Sometimes a band can be no more than the sum of it's parts, but BEAK> are an equation in which it's impossible to define equivalents or totals. Instead the meeting of three talent's form a foundation from which idea's assimilate and propagate. Those talents are: Billy Fuller. Reared in Bristol, on an aural diet of anything and everything, facilitated later by his time working in the cities top independent record shop Replay Records, and also playing with handfuls of bands – including Invada's first signing: Fuzz Against Funk, as well as Massive Attack, Robert Plant, and Malakai. Billy is BEAK>'S thoughtful pulse; his bass a forceful origin for their superlative narrative arcs. Matt Williams. Picked up a Yamaha keyboard aged three and never looked back, as Team Brick creates dissonance that immediately elucidates free forming thought, and impacts heavily on BEAK>'S rolling landscape. He enjoys playing air drums whilst cycling, singing lines from a favourite Latin prayer and doesn't understand the music he makes himself. Geoff Barrow. Musician and producer born near Bristol. Best known for forming and producing popular music group Portishead and part owner of the independent record label Invada Records . Commenting on working in BEAK> "its really good to create music under different conditions than your used too."
A Place to Bury Strangers
A Place to Bury Strangers
Try, if only for a moment, to envision a scenario in which you could still be completely *surprised* by a rock band. It’s not easy. In fact, it’s increasingly rare.

A couple of years ago, A Place to Bury Strangers were in search of a new drummer. Lia Simone Braswell, an L.A. native, had recently moved to New York, and was playing drums in shows around Brooklyn “just to keep her chops up.” As it turned out, APTBS bassist Dion Lunadon caught one of those shows and, after seeing her play, was moved to ask her if she’d want to come to a band practice sometime.

“I told some of my friends about it before I met up with them,” Braswell says, of the rehearsal that would soon lead to her joining the band. “They told me, ‘You’re just gonna have to keep up as much as you possibly can.’”

“To be fair, she had also never seen us live,”Lunadon adds. “She didn’t necessarily know what she was getting into.”

What she was getting into: For well over a decade now, A Place to Bury Strangers—Lunadon, founding guitarist/singer Oliver Ackermann, and, officially, Braswell—have become well known for their unwavering commitment to unpredictable, often bewildering live shows, and total, some might say dangerous volume. They don’t write setlists. They frequently write new songs mid-set. They deliberately provoke and sabotage sound people in a variety of cruel yet innovative ways. They can and will always surprise you. “When something goes wrong on-stage, a lot of bands will crumble under the pressure,” says Ackermann. “We like the idea of embracing the moment when things go wrong and turning it into the best thing about the show.”

This April marks the release of Pinned, their fifth full-length and an album that finds them converting difficult moments into some of their most urgent work to date. It’s their first since the 2016 election, and their first since the 2014 closing of Death By Audio, the beloved Brooklyn DIY space where Ackerman lived, worked, and created with complete freedom. “After DBA closed, I moved to an apartment in Clinton Hill,” he says. “I couldn’t make too much noise, couldn’t disturb my neighbors. I would just sit there and write with a drum machine. It had to be about writing a good song and not about being super, sonically loud.

”There are searing meditations on truth and government-led conspiracies (“Execution”), as well as haunting, harmonized responses to the tensions of our current political climate (“There’s Only One of Us”). It all opens with “Never Coming Back,” a frightening crescendo of group vocals, vertiginous guitar work, and Lunadon’s unrelenting bass. “That song is a big concept,” Ackermann says. “You make these decisions in your life...you’re contemplating whether or not this will be the end. You think of your mortality, those moments you could die and what that means. You’re thinking about that edge of the end, deciding whether or not it’s over. When you’re close to that edge, you could teeter over.”

It’s a clear and honest statement of intent, not just for everything that follows, but for this band as a whole.“As things go on, you don’t want them to be stagnant,”Ackermann says. “Being a band for ten years, it’s hard to keep things moving forward. I see so many bands that have been around and they’re a weaker version of what they used to be. This band is anti-that. We try to push ourselves constantly, with the live shows and the recordings. We always want to get better. You’ve got to dig deep and take chances, and sometimes, I questioned that. It took really breaking through to make it work. I think we did that.”

They definitely did.
Chasms
Chasms
Chasms is the San Francisco based project of Jess Labrador and Shannon Madden. The duo crafts percussive dirges that are at once beautiful and menacing. Labrador's haunting vocals and hypnotizing guitar work wade between rhythmic bass lines and bursts of Madden's stinging feedback, laid on a bed of pummeling drum programming. The band's affinity for industrial rhythms, swelling textures, precise minimalism, and chaotic eruptions of noise sounds as equally informed by shoegaze as drone and doom metal—to choose just one would be a disservice.

Sign Up For The Spaceland Newsletter

More Upcoming Events

Draco Rosa

Draco Rosa

Wed December 12

The Regent Theater

More Info

Derde Verde - Second Wednesdays Residency

Derde Verde - Second Wednesdays Residency

Wed December 12

The Love Song

More Info

Free

LOVE in LA (A Benefit for the victims of the Woolsey Fire)

LOVE in LA (A Benefit for the victims of the Woolsey Fire)

Wed December 12

The Echo

More Info